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Third Economic Impact Payments

IRS is issuing third round of Economic Impact Payments

The IRS started issuing the third round of Economic Impact Payments. No action is needed by most taxpayers. The IRS will issue payments automatically by direct deposit and through the mail as a check or debit card.

Many people will receive the third payment the same way they received the first and second Economic Impact Payments. Because these payments are automatic for most eligible people, there’s no need to contact financial institutions or the IRS. People can check the Get My Payment tool on IRS.gov for status of their third stimulus payment.

Highlights of the third Economic Impact Payments
In general, most people will get $1,400 for themselves and $1,400 for each qualifying dependent claimed on their tax return. As with the first two Economic Impact Payments, most people will receive their third payment without having to take any action.

The third Economic Impact Payment is based on the taxpayer’s latest processed tax return from either 2020 or 2019. This includes anyone who successfully registered at IRS.gov using the agency’s Non-Filers tool last year or submitted a simplified tax return. If the IRS received and processed a taxpayer’s 2020 return before issuing someone’s third Economic Impact Payment, the amount is based on the 2020 return.

Those who received the first or second payment but don’t receive a payment by direct deposit will generally receive a check or a prepaid debit card, referred to as an EIP Card. The IRS will not add the third payment to an existing EIP card that people received for the first or second round of stimulus payments.

Under the new law, the IRS can’t apply the third Economic Impact Payment to past-due federal debts or back taxes.

Who is eligible for the third Economic Impact Payment
Generally, U.S. citizens or U.S. resident aliens are eligible for the full amount of the third Economic Impact Payment if they and their spouse, if they’re filing jointly, are not a dependent of another taxpayer and have a valid Social Security number and their adjusted gross income on their tax return does not exceed:

  • $150,000, if married and filing a joint return or if filing as a qualifying widow or widower.
  • $112,500, if filing as head of household.
  • $75,000 for eligible individuals using any other filing statuses, such as single filers and married people filing separate returns.

The payments phase out — or reduce — above those AGI amounts. This means taxpayers will not receive a third payment if their AGI exceeds:

  • $160,000, if married and filing a joint return or if filing as a qualifying widow or widower.
  • $120,000, if filing as head of household.
  • $80,000 for eligible individuals using other filing statuses, such as single filers and married people filing separate returns.

More details about the third round of Economic Impact Payments are available on IRS.gov.

 

Source: IRS
https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/irs-is-issuing-third-round-of-economic-impact-payments

Tax Tip – End of Tax Year

Get ready to file taxes: What to do before the tax year ends

There are things taxpayers can do before the end of the year to help them get ready for the 2021 tax filing season. Below are a few of them.

Donate to charity
There is still time to make a 2020 donation. Taxpayers who don’t itemize deductions may take a charitable deduction of up to $300 for cash contributions made in 2020 to qualifying charities. Cash donations include those made by check, credit card or debit card. Before making a donation, people can check the Tax Exempt Organization Search tool on IRS.gov to make sure the organization is eligible for tax-deductible donations.

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act changed this law. The CARES Act also temporarily suspends limits on charitable contributions and temporarily increases limits on contributions of food inventory.
 
Report any name or address change
Taxpayers who moved should notify the IRS of their new address. They should also notify the Social Security Administration of any name change.

Renew expiring ITINs
Certain Individual Taxpayer Identification Numbers expire at the end of this year. Taxpayers can visit the ITIN page on IRS.gov for more information on which numbers need renewal.

Connect with the IRS
Taxpayers can use social media to get the latest tax and filing tips from the IRS. The IRS shares information on things like tax changes, scam alerts, initiatives, tax products and taxpayer services. These social media tools are available in different languages, including English, Spanish and American Sign Language.

Find information about retirement plans
IRS.gov has end-of-year find tax information about retirement plans. This includes resources for individuals about retirement planning, contributions and withdrawals. The CARES Act retirement plan relief waived required minimum distributions during 2020 for IRA or retirement plan accounts. Also, eligible individuals can take a coronavirus-related distribution of up to $100,000 by December 30, 2020 and repay it over three years or pay the tax due over three years.

Contribute salary deferral
Taxpayers can make a salary deferral to a retirement plan. This helps maximize the tax credit available for eligible contributions. Taxpayers should make sure their total salary deferral contributions do not exceed the $19,500 limit for 2020.

Think about tax refunds
Taxpayers should be careful not to expect getting a refund by a certain date. This is especially true for those who plan to use their refund to make major purchases or pay bills. Just as each tax return is unique to the individual, so is each taxpayer’s refund. Taxpayers can take steps now to get ready to file their federal tax return in 2021.

 

Source: IRS

https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/get-ready-to-file-taxes-what-to-do-before-the-tax-year-ends

Tax Tip – New Business Owners

Tax Tip! Understanding the tax responsibilities that come with starting a business venture can save taxpayers money and help set them up for success. IRS.gov has the resources and answers to help people through the process of starting a new business.

Here are six tips for new business owners.

Choose a business structure.

The form of business determines which income tax return a business taxpayer needs to file. The most common business structures are:

  • Sole proprietorship: An unincorporated business owned by an individual. There’s no distinction between the taxpayer and their business.
  • Partnership: An unincorporated business with ownership shared between two or more people.
  • Corporation: Also known as a C corporation. It’s a separate entity owned by shareholders.
  • S Corporation: A corporation that elects to pass corporate income, losses, deductions and credits through to the shareholders.
  • Limited Liability Company: A business structure allowed by state statute.
Choose a tax year.

A tax year is an annual accounting period for keeping records and reporting income and expenses. A new business owner must choose either:

  • Calendar year: 12 consecutive months beginning January 1 and ending December 31.
  • Fiscal year: 12 consecutive months ending on the last day of any month except December.
Apply for an employer identification number (EIN).

An EIN is also called a federal tax identification number. It’s used to identify a business. Most businesses need one of these numbers. It’s important for a business with an EIN to keep the business mailing address, location and responsible party up to date. IRS regulations require EIN holders to report changes in the responsible party within 60 days. They do this by completing Form 8822-B, Change of Address or Responsible Party and mailing it to the address on the form.

Have all employees complete these forms:
Pay business taxes.

The form of business determines what taxes must be paid and how to pay them.

Visit state’s website.

Prospective business owners should visit their state’s website for info about state requirements.

(Resource: https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/six-tips-for-people-starting-a-new-business)

PPP Loan Extension

The application window for the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) has been extended until Aug. 8th. The five-week extension had been approved last week by both chambers of Congress. The U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate both passed the legislation by unanimous consent. Full Article Here: https://www.journalofaccountancy.com/news/2020/jul/senate-approves-5-week-ppp-extension.html

The PPP, which has approximately $129 billion in funding remaining, was launched in early April as the COVID-19 pandemic battered the U.S. economy and forced many businesses to close. The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) provides forgivable loans that small businesses can use to cover payroll and other select costs; https://www.sba.gov/funding-programs/loans/coronavirus-relief-options/paycheck-protection-program

If you need help filing for the PPP, AABS is here for you! Contact us today!